Ladders

There are numerous cases within the cleaning sector of accidents involving working at height, for example: whilst working on ladders, overstretching from ladders whilst window cleaning and standing on chairs to clean high level surfaces for example. With a small amount of planning and by using competent people, who have the right experience and training and the right equipment, these accidents can be easily avoidable.
What you must do

The law

Work at Height Regulations 2005 place duties on employers, the self-employed, and any person that controls the work of others (for example facilities managers or building owners who may contract others to work at height).
As part of the Regulations, duty holders must ensure:

• All work at height is properly planned and organised;
• Those involved in work at height are competent;
• The risks from work at height are assessed and appropriate work equipment is selected and used;
• The risks from fragile surfaces are properly controlled; and
• Equipment for work at height is properly inspected and maintained.

There is a simple hierarchy for managing and selecting equipment for work at height. Duty holders must:

• Avoid work at height where they can;
• Use work equipment or other measures to prevent falls where they cannot avoid working at height; and
• Where they cannot eliminate the risk of a fall, use work equipment or other measures to minimise the distance and consequences of a fall should one occur.

Call Alpine Facilities Services on 0845 520 2014 for further detailed information, a free consultation and free risk assessments as part of our inclusive service solution. Office cleaning Manchester